Tag Archives: guest posts

‘Small things’ in humanitarian work

Anaïs Rességuier, researcher in humanitarian ethics at SciencesPo Paris, reflects on the importance of small acts of kindness and humanity in humanitarian work Is small beautiful? Or is small… just small, as a speaker wondered at the recent Humanitarian Innovation … Continue reading

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Can aid workers be activists?

In this new guest-post the author explores how humanitarian agencies “kill” the spirit of humanitarianism in aid workers  A guest post by an impassioned humanitarian aid worker.* Ever since I left my job at a women’s rights organization and went … Continue reading

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4 ways toxic workplaces are harming the social good sector

Guest post by Jennifer Lentfer   “How toxic is your work environment?” Between the quiz in the New York Times recently or the many(!) articles found on the subject in Fast Company, Forbes, Monster or LifeHacker, you’d think there’s an epidemic … Continue reading

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Managing teams in dangerous places—the self-destructor

A guest post by J. If you’re a manager in the aid world whose role and team are based in the field (or a deployable, field-facing team based elsewhere), I’d be willing to bet that you have at least one … Continue reading

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Managing teams in dangerous places—The basics.

A guest post by J. Those of you who follow my writing in other places know that I’m a full-time, professional humanitarian worker, a die-hard believer in the humanitarian enterprise. What I’ve said less often publicly is that for the … Continue reading

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Humanitarian aid worker, aid thyself

Guest contribution by Allison Smith and Brendan Rigby, on a new aid worker support initiative by WhyDev Aid workers tend to suffer higher-than-normal rates of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, burnout and anxiety. Members of the humanitarian community are well aware that getting drunk while out … Continue reading

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The Workplace Revolution

Lucky me I was in London last week and had the chance to meet writer and activist Liam Barrington-Bush at his book launch. I connected with Liam back in the summer when I heard about his upcoming crowd-funded book Anarchists in the … Continue reading

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Looking after myself and others in Gaza

Guest post by Emilia Sorrentino humanitarian aid worker in the Gaza Strip I arrived in Gaza a few weeks after Vittorio Arrigoni’s murder*, where I joined a group of Italian aid workers based in Gaza City who were working for different … Continue reading

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I want to be an aid worker

3 things that separate the good aid workers from the burn-outs A guest-post by Elie Losleben, aid worker based in West Africa I grew up in the aid business, with my mother, a public health practitioner, talking about under-five mortality … Continue reading

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Aid Worker: First, Know Thyself

“Self-awareness is the first step in transformation so if you are interested in becoming a better aid worker, the process starts with you”. From How Matters here is a thought-provoking post on the importance for aid workers to develop awareness. by Jennifer Lentfer The … Continue reading

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